Sunday, February 18, 2018

Diversity in social movements

The diversity of movements and organisations shapes them.

This might sound trite, but it also creates a barrier to more diverse movements. This 2011 Daily Kos article is one of my favourite things on the Internet. (I know. The headline. Persevere.) It's a consultant's story about trying to help feminist groups become more racially diverse.

This isn't necessarily about racism or sexism or classism or anythingelseism. It's more about a kind of Hayekian concept of privilege. We don't know what's in other peoples' heads, so we miss stuff when we don't interact with or listen to each other.

Treating the Daily Kos article as a case study gives some insight into the barriers to diversity and shows us why diversifying can lead to pushback.

Wednesday, February 07, 2018

Don't cheer for gridlock

In The Meaning of Democracy and the Vulnerabilities of Democracies: A Response to Tocqueville's Challenge, Vincent Ostrom argues that a democratic society must be a self-governing society. Not just one that's designed the right way.

By explaining why people need to be able to use persuasion and work together to solve their problems to keep democracy healthy, Ostrom gives us a useful way to think about a common concern: gridlock. Libertarians often cheer for gridlock. We shouldn't. And not just because it's tone deaf.

Monday, February 05, 2018

Minding my monsters

Sarah Skwire has a great note about dealing with hard stuff on her Facebook page.
I was talking to a friend today about the struggle it is to do things when the things you have to get done are really unpleasant and scary--like managing the details of a divorce, or researching your husband’s cancer diagnosis, or whatever particular horror lurks in your own closet of nightmares. 
I’m not talking about motivating yourself to deal with a pile of boring stuff. That’s a different problem. 
This is about having a giant scary monster in a box that you HAVE to open and deal with before you can do whatever good stuff comes after it. And you have to deal with the monster while maintaining your job and your life and your responsibilities. It’s really hard. 

Friday, February 02, 2018

Sweet talk and self-governance

We haven't heard as much lately about panic over falling faith in democracy, but questions about the proper scope of democracy and what we mean by "democracy" are still relevant. Is democracy popping a ballot in a box, or does it include our conversations and what we do as communities?

Vincent Ostrom asks this question in The Meaning of Democracy and the Vulnerabilities of Democracies: A Response to Tocqueville's Challenge, and urges us to recognise a seldom-discussed danger to democracy. We often hear that we need to do more than just vote—we need to vote well. But, says Ostrom, we also need to be able to persuade each other—to use what Deirdre McCloskey calls "sweet talk". Sweet talk is how we get people to act together when we can't force them to. But we have to persuade well, the right way—building buy-in and consensus. The wrong kind of persuasion might be as dangerous as the wrong kind of voting. "Rhetoric pursued as an art of manipulation can be a trap contributing to the vulnerability of democratic societies." (xiii)