Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Bernier's bad bet

Adrian Wyld/Canadian Press

Maxime Bernier is taking a gamble. He believes that there is a large, disenfranchised voting bloc in Canada on which he can capitalise to form a new party that, he says, will focus on smaller, constitutional government that respects taxpayers and opposes economic favouritism—though he's spent more time in the news for culture warring.

His gamble seems to be that the anti-immigration and anti-political correctness crowds to whom he's been throwing bones will (a) make up a part, but not the basis, of his political coalition, and (b) be willing to make concessions on these issues to support a core mission of smaller, constitutionally restrained government.

Unfortunately for Bernier, if he's sincere that this is his goal he's made his gamble based on an out-of-date understanding of politics in Western countries. The political climate in which this was likely to succeed—the one in which Bernier has spent his political career—is changing.

Tuesday, August 14, 2018

Closing borders is only the last step

Image result for stephen miller public domain photoStephen Miller's uncle has a personal and moving public appeal to his nephew in Politico.

The story he tells, of his grandfather, will remind many of us of the stories we proudly tell of our ancestors coming to Canada or the U.S. with nothing and building a life through hard work.

Sunday, August 05, 2018

The wrong kind of anti-democratic

Who are "the people" and how do they make their needs known to their representatives?

Ontario's Progressive Conservative government has announced that it will cut the size of Toronto's city council almost in half.

This odd decision (mid-election, it's an expensive one) creates an opportunity to address an interesting quirk about Ontario's right-of-centre party. Sometimes people will say something along the lines of, "LOL!! Progressive Conservative? Sounds like an oxymoron to me!"

A better understanding of early 20th-century politics, progressivism, and conservatism can show us why it's not. It also helps us explore why the Ontario PCs might support smaller municipal councils and why doing so might be a mistake.

Sunday, February 18, 2018

Diversity in social movements

The diversity of movements and organisations shapes them.

This might sound trite, but it also creates a barrier to more diverse movements. This 2011 Daily Kos article is one of my favourite things on the Internet. (I know. The headline. Persevere.) It's a consultant's story about trying to help feminist groups become more racially diverse.

This isn't necessarily about racism or sexism or classism or anythingelseism. It's more about a kind of Hayekian concept of privilege. We don't know what's in other peoples' heads, so we miss stuff when we don't interact with or listen to each other.

Treating the Daily Kos article as a case study gives some insight into the barriers to diversity and shows us why diversifying can lead to pushback.